New Study Identifies How Disbelief, Lack of Support Negatively Affects Fibromyalgia Patients

New Study Identifies How Disbelief, Lack of Support Negatively Affects Fibromyalgia Patients
Results from a recent study published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research indicate that the construct of invalidation as perceived by patients with fibromyalgia includes active negative social responses as well as a lack of positive social responses with respect to the patient and their condition. In this setting, the psychological "construct of invalidation" indicates the perception that a person with fibromyalgia does not really suffer from any real, physical illness. Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain condition of unknown etiology. More than in other rheumatic diseases, in fibromyalgia the absence of pathologic evidence, observable deformity, and laboratory testing, as well as the inherent invisibility of its core symptom pain and other symptoms can cause disbelief about the legitimacy of fibromyalgia and may hamper the signaling of the person's pain and physical disabilities to the environment. Although there is not a single good term to capture all of the components of this phenomenon, the term “invalidation” has been used to refer to a constellation of features that includes nonacceptance by others, misunderstanding, disbelief, rejection, stigmatization, and suspicion that the problem is exaggerated or psychological. Understanding the impact of invalidation may help to improve fibromyalgia patients treatment by instructing society about fibromyalgia. Currently there is no official definition of the construct of invalidation. In this regard, in the study titled “Understanding the
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.