Do Perfectionistic Personalities Predispose Persons To Chronic Fatigue?

Do Perfectionistic Personalities Predispose Persons To Chronic Fatigue?
A report in the current issue of the Journal Of Psychotherapy And Psychosomatics (P&P) describes the role perfectionism may play in development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and in other possibly related medical disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia that are frequently coexistent. The report observes that biopsychosocial CFS models suggest that personality and stress have predisposing and perpetuating influence in developing the persistent and unexplained fatigue that characterizes what has been classified as a functional somatic syndrome. The authors point to studies indicating that personal characteristics of many CFS patients frequently include achievement-oriented and perfectionist personalities, and that those tendencies coupled with a drive toward self-criticism in these individuals that can compel them to work beyond the point of exhaustion to a degree that may initiate or perpetuate chronic fatigue symptoms. The report also notes that while research indicates that CFS patients typically apply maladaptive coping strategies more frequently than do healthy controls, it remains unknown as to whether this represents true relative to other chronic illness groups. The P&P study compared perfectionism dimensions and maladaptive coping styles observed in CFS patients with corresponding behaviors of healthy controls and two other chronic illness groups, with participant subjects drawn from larger samplings of community-dwelling adults in various US or Canadian locations who completed an anonymous online personality and health survey an
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.